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As per the report by Global Market Insights, Inc. “Worldwide Sports Nutrition Ingredients market was valued USD 3.5 billion in 2022 and will surpass a revenue collection of USD 7.3 billion by 2032 with an annual growth rate of 7.5 % over 2023 to 2032.”

Sports Nutrition Ingredients Market is expected to grow considerably through 2032 owing to the increasing consumption of protein-based products by athletes and bodybuilders. Sports nutrition helps the body to promote fast recovery. It also delays the onset of fatigue, enhances body composition, strength, and concentration assisting in maintaining a healthy immune system, further reducing the risk of heat cramps and GI distress.

Overall, the industry is segmented in terms of product, form, age group, application, end-use and region.

Based on the product, the protein segment will be valued at over USD 1 billion by 2032. Increasing awareness regarding the benefits of consumption of protein for healthy body and a rise in health consciousness among consumers will bolster the product demand in functional foods and beverages and supplement applications. Besides, protein helps athletes build muscles, repair tissues, and make enzymes and hormones. In addition, protein consumption also helps in weight loss and toning the muscles.

On the 7 February 2023, the World Citrus Organisation (WCO) held a meeting for members of the Organisation’s global citrus community to exchange on citrus consumption and market developments. The meeting gathered leading citrus stakeholders from across the world to analyse the citrus sector’s place in current fruit and vegetable consumption trends, as well as market evolutions in Europe and in particular Germany, the home of Fruit Logistica. The meeting was part of WCO’s commitment to provide a platform for dialogue and action for the global citrus sector.

On the eve of the 30th anniversary of Fruit Logistica, WCO members met in Berlin to exchange on citrus consumption and market developments. On the back of challenging climatic conditions across many countries for citrus, the sector, like others in fresh produce, is grappling with quickly changing consumption trends. With consumers moving into a post-COVID mindset and priority shifting to the price of a shopping basket, purchasing decisions are shifting across demographics. WCO’s meeting at Fruit Logistica featured a guest presentation by Helwig Schwartau (AMI) on market and consumption evolutions in Europe, with particular focus on Germany. This was complemented by a presentation on the latest fresh produce consumption trends by WCO Data Analyst Gil Kaufman as well as a presentation on the Organisation’s priority areas for action by WCO Policy Advisor Nicola Pisano.

Uniting citrus-producing countries and citrus stakeholders for collective action in the citrus sector, the WCO is holding meetings for members to better understand market developments and demand dynamics to best position the sector. WCO Secretary General Philippe Binard, commented, “Through the WCO the citrus sector is staying abreast of market evolutions. Thanks to the active involvement of its members from around the globe in sharing supply and demand observations and forecast data in a pre-competitive format along with informative market insights presentations at meetings, the sector is better positioning products not only on domestic markets but also further afield”. Mr Binard added that, “Citrus is still a prominent category in Europe with oranges and mandarins together as the second most popular fruits after apples with consumption at 12.43kg per capita per year. However, despite most citrus products now returning to pre-pandemic consumption levels, younger generations are showing slightly higher purchasing volumes overall. Although households are increasingly shopping according to more limited budgets, citrus is remaining a key element in fresh fruit and vegetable selection”.

The outlook for consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables remains under pressure in the European Union. These are the conclusions from the latest consumption trends discussed in Freshfel Europe through a review of trends in Member States, covering 75 % of the EU population. Despite a very positive momentum for consumption growth, many barriers are severely impacting the move towards a healthier and more sustainable diet for European consumers.

The latest findings from the Freshfel Europe Consumption Monitor reveal that the average consumption for fresh produce stands at an average of 364 g/capita/day for 2021, a figure that could decline by ca 10 % in 2022 once the final data for last year is known. This is particularly worrying at it stays well below the minimum 400 gr. recommendation of WHO. These figures are driven by the low level of consumption by millennials and the youngest generations, which are tomorrow’s consumers. Under the difficult economic conditions, the consumption among the low-income population is also of particular concern. Informing and engaging with consumers to choose healthy, affordable and sustainable diets was identified as a priority not only for Freshfel Europe but also for retailer organisation EuroCommerce and the consumer organisation BEUC who attended the meeting to share their perspectives.

The economic crisis impacting all Member States following the war in Ukraine and growing protectionism in the world is severely impacting consumer purchasing power and limiting their food expenditure. In times of crisis, these consumers tend to move towards a less healthy diet, which is perceived to be more energy satisfactory and a cheaper food option. Freshfel Europe General Delegate Philippe Binard underlined, “Consumers have a basic misperception about fruit and vegetable prices on the shelf in supermarkets. Fruit and vegetables are the most affordable products and have also undisputed health and environmental assets. Price and value of fresh produce are both very attractive in the food assortment”. He added, “Compared to other food categories, rises in fruit and vegetable prices have been lower than the average inflation. A diet with 5 portions a day or half of the plate with fruit and vegetables can be achieved by EUR 1 or EUR 2 per person per day. Comparatively, for public expenditure of social security, the cost of unhealthy diets results to be twice as high of the total food market value, corresponding to EUR 6 trillion expenditure for social security in the EU according to the World Economic Forum”.

There is a need for the sector to bridge the gap between awareness of the benefits of fresh produce and concrete actions to be undertaken by authorities as well as by consumers. According to Eurostat survey, only 12 % of consumers across the EU reach their 5 portions per day and alarmingly 33 % do not eat fruit and vegetables every day. It is important now to build on the renewed interest of consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic to take time to prepare, cook and eat a wide diversity of fruit and vegetables.

Fresh produce has been demonstrated to be an essential segment of the food assortment and is part of the solution to the objectives of the European Green Deal (contribution to carbon neutrality and low CO2 emissions), the Farm to Fork Strategy (move towards a plant diet) and the EU Beating Cancer Plan (preventive role of fruit and vegetables for non-communicable diseases).

Mr. Binard commented, “Regretfully, policy makers fail to be coherent in the implementation of these strategies and lack ambition in their measures, which should use fresh produce as an essential driver for success for their strategies”. Efficient promotion policy towards generation Y (millennials) and Z as well as education programmes in schools for generation alpha are crucial. The sector also has an important role to play in accompanying consumers to convert their awareness of the health benefits of fresh produce into concrete eating behaviours. In addition, better communication with consumers on expectations regarding societal concerns, price and image misperception will remain key while providing attractive tastes, diversity and convenience of products. This is an essential sector’s responsibility to compete with other food categories.

The latest consumption trends indicate that consumption levels are in decline. The purchasing power of consumers is under pressure due to inflation and high household energy bills. This is changing purchasing patterns away from premium quality and organic products, towards searching for promotions and discount prices, as well as reducing purchase quantities. Mr. Binard emphasized, “In this changing environment it is important to continue to build value for our products despite price becoming the sole priority of consumers. The affordability of fresh produce needs to be reminded to consumers and put in perspective of other food as being a cheap and healthy option. Consumers will have also to take their share of the rising costs for producers and other stakeholders in the supply chain to guarantee profitability and survival of the essential fruit and vegetable sector.”

In 2021, the market size for fresh fruit and vegetables amounted to 75 Mio T out of which comprises 11,6 Mio T in Italy, 11 Mio T in Germany, 10 Mio T in France, 9 Mio T in Spain and 7,2 Mio T in Poland. The most consumed fruit in Europe are apples, bananas, oranges, tables grapes and peaches/nectarines, while blueberries is the segment that is experiencing the most dynamic growth in many members states such as Germany and Poland. For vegetables, tomatoes, cabbages, carrots, cucumbers and sweet peppers are the most consumed products respectively.

In their review of the latest drivers of consumption, Freshfel Europe members confirmed that price is predominantly influencing the decision of consumers in recent months across Europe and consumers are buying less alimentary items. Mr. Binard further clarified, “This trend is impacting the frequency and place of buying, where a concentration of purchase is occurring in the beginning of the month along with a reduction of ingredients and items purchased. Premium labels and organic sales are those segments declining more”. Besides, Association members also reconfirmed that consumers remain adamant to buy local and seasonal, are eager to be informed about origin, variety, method of production, sustainable practices and when appropriate preparation or consumption tips.

Freshfel Europe members remain confident that fresh produce consumption can be stimulated in the coming months by building partnerships across the supply chain with all actors, providing quality and affordable products, and giving confidence to retailers to build the share of the category as an essential part of a sustainable and healthy diet for European consumers in 2023.

The outlook for consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables remains under pressure in the European Union. These are the conclusions from the latest consumption trends discussed in Freshfel Europe through a review of trends in Member States, covering 75 % of the EU population. Despite a very positive momentum for consumption growth, many barriers are severely impacting the move towards a healthier and more sustainable diet for European consumers.

The latest findings from the Freshfel Europe Consumption Monitor reveal that the average consumption for fresh produce stands at an average of 364 g/capita/day for 2021, a figure that could decline by ca 10 % in 2022 once the final data for last year is known. This is particularly worrying at it stays well below the minimum 400 gr. recommendation of WHO. These figures are driven by the low level of consumption by millennials and the youngest generations, which are tomorrow’s consumers. Under the difficult economic conditions, the consumption among the low-income population is also of particular concern. Informing and engaging with consumers to choose healthy, affordable and sustainable diets was identified as a priority not only for Freshfel Europe but also for retailer organisation EuroCommerce and the consumer organisation BEUC who attended the meeting to share their perspectives.

The economic crisis impacting all Member States following the war in Ukraine and growing protectionism in the world is severely impacting consumer purchasing power and limiting their food expenditure. In times of crisis, these consumers tend to move towards a less healthy diet, which is perceived to be more energy satisfactory and a cheaper food option. Freshfel Europe General Delegate Philippe Binard underlined, “Consumers have a basic misperception about fruit and vegetable prices on the shelf in supermarkets. Fruit and vegetables are the most affordable products and have also undisputed health and environmental assets. Price and value of fresh produce are both very attractive in the food assortment”. He added, “Compared to other food categories, rises in fruit and vegetable prices have been lower than the average inflation. A diet with 5 portions a day or half of the plate with fruit and vegetables can be achieved by EUR 1 or EUR 2 per person per day. Comparatively, for public expenditure of social security, the cost of unhealthy diets results to be twice as high of the total food market value, corresponding to EUR 6 trillion expenditure for social security in the EU according to the World Economic Forum”.

There is a need for the sector to bridge the gap between awareness of the benefits of fresh produce and concrete actions to be undertaken by authorities as well as by consumers. According to Eurostat survey, only 12 % of consumers across the EU reach their 5 portions per day and alarmingly 33 % do not eat fruit and vegetables every day. It is important now to build on the renewed interest of consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic to take time to prepare, cook and eat a wide diversity of fruit and vegetables.

Fresh produce has been demonstrated to be an essential segment of the food assortment and is part of the solution to the objectives of the European Green Deal (contribution to carbon neutrality and low CO2 emissions), the Farm to Fork Strategy (move towards a plant diet) and the EU Beating Cancer Plan (preventive role of fruit and vegetables for non-communicable diseases).

Mr. Binard commented, “Regretfully, policy makers fail to be coherent in the implementation of these strategies and lack ambition in their measures, which should use fresh produce as an essential driver for success for their strategies”. Efficient promotion policy towards generation Y (millennials) and Z as well as education programmes in schools for generation alpha are crucial. The sector also has an important role to play in accompanying consumers to convert their awareness of the health benefits of fresh produce into concrete eating behaviours. In addition, better communication with consumers on expectations regarding societal concerns, price and image misperception will remain key while providing attractive tastes, diversity and convenience of products. This is an essential sector’s responsibility to compete with other food categories.

The latest consumption trends indicate that consumption levels are in decline. The purchasing power of consumers is under pressure due to inflation and high household energy bills. This is changing purchasing patterns away from premium quality and organic products, towards searching for promotions and discount prices, as well as reducing purchase quantities. Mr. Binard emphasized, “In this changing environment it is important to continue to build value for our products despite price becoming the sole priority of consumers. The affordability of fresh produce needs to be reminded to consumers and put in perspective of other food as being a cheap and healthy option. Consumers will have also to take their share of the rising costs for producers and other stakeholders in the supply chain to guarantee profitability and survival of the essential fruit and vegetable sector.”

In 2021, the market size for fresh fruit and vegetables amounted to 75 Mio T out of which comprises 11,6 Mio T in Italy, 11 Mio T in Germany, 10 Mio T in France, 9 Mio T in Spain and 7,2 Mio T in Poland. The most consumed fruit in Europe are apples, bananas, oranges, tables grapes and peaches/nectarines, while blueberries is the segment that is experiencing the most dynamic growth in many members states such as Germany and Poland. For vegetables, tomatoes, cabbages, carrots, cucumbers and sweet peppers are the most consumed products respectively.

In their review of the latest drivers of consumption, Freshfel Europe members confirmed that price is predominantly influencing the decision of consumers in recent months across Europe and consumers are buying less alimentary items. Mr. Binard further clarified, “This trend is impacting the frequency and place of buying, where a concentration of purchase is occurring in the beginning of the month along with a reduction of ingredients and items purchased. Premium labels and organic sales are those segments declining more”. Besides, Association members also reconfirmed that consumers remain adamant to buy local and seasonal, are eager to be informed about origin, variety, method of production, sustainable practices and when appropriate preparation or consumption tips.

Freshfel Europe members remain confident that fresh produce consumption can be stimulated in the coming months by building partnerships across the supply chain with all actors, providing quality and affordable products, and giving confidence to retailers to build the share of the category as an essential part of a sustainable and healthy diet for European consumers in 2023.

In 2020 and continuing into 2021, COVID-19 has profoundly affected trading in the UK, with the cider market losing 16.3 %* volume in 2020, dropping to 7837.36 thousand hectolitres, according to GlobalData. However, the leading data and analytics company notes that, with restrictions being lifted and most businesses emerging from lockdown, the possibility of a successful trading year for many companies should not be ruled out, especially those heavily involved in beer and cider production.

Chloe Gbadero, Senior Beverages Analyst at GlobalData, comments: “The lifting of restrictions is great news for companies such as C&C Group, a large cider producer in the UK, which saw a 56.1 %** revenue decline during 2020 due to lockdown measures and an overall downturn for the industry. In H2 2021, C&C Group, and many other companies, have potential to see volume uplifts compared to last year, now that bars and pubs have reopened. This, combined with the potential for warm and sunny weather during the summer months, will continue to encourage outdoor dining and companies would do well to take advantage of the remaining summer months to recoup sales losses during lockdown.”

In GlobalData’s most recent survey in the UK, 21 %*** of respondents demonstrated that when it comes to alcoholic beverages, including cider, fruity flavours are the most appealing. This is 4 % more than citrus flavoured alcoholic products, highlighting a gap in the market for unique flavoured fruit ciders – which producers could benefit from through innovation of products for the remainder of 2021, as usually UK consumers are not the most experimental, preferring sweet and fruity flavours over unique/novel.

Gbadero continues: “It would be interesting to see if alcohol companies will consider further promoting their pre-existing flavoured beverages or introduce new variants in order to encourage further growth. For instance, Old Mout has introduced a new watermelon and lime flavoured variant to its range, following the successful launch of its pineapple and raspberry flavor.

“After a less than favourable 2020, which has fueled long-term loss in the forecast period to 2026, there is still light at the end of the tunnel for this well-established and popular category, provided that producers continue to innovate in line with changing consumer behaviors, and collaborate with on-premise locations to promote cider consumption.”

*GlobalData’s Intelligence Centre – Quarterly Beverage Forecast
**C&C Group – Annual Report 2020
***GlobalData’s Consumer Survey – Q2 United Kingdom

Freshfel Europe published its 2020 Consumption Monitor, the Association’s analysis for fresh fruit and vegetables production, trade and consumption trends in the EU-28. This latest and highly anticipated edition of Freshfel Europe’s Consumption Monitor shows that in 2018 daily fresh fruit and vegetable consumption per capita has increased by 4 % from 2017 levels to 363.76 g per capita per day. While still below the WHO recommended minimum daily consumption of 400 g, this represents a 5.1 % increase compared to the previous five years (2013-2017) and halts previous consumption stagnation.

Freshfel Europe released its much-anticipated 2020 Consumption Monitor. Analysing fresh fruit and vegetable production, trade and consumption trends for the EU-28, Freshfel Europe’s 2020 Consumption Monitor examines the latest sector data from 2018. While aggregate consumption remained below the WHO recommended minimum daily consumption of 400 g, fresh produce consumption in the EU showed a strong positive increase of 4 % compared to 2017 levels. Representing a 5.1 % increase compared to the previous five years (2013-2017), this significant improvement can be attributed to a 9.5 % rise in fresh fruit consumption to 211.82 g per capita per day, which also compensated for a slight overall decrease in vegetable consumption to 151.94 g per capita per day.

This indication of a strong positive increase in EU consumption has coincided with increased sector efforts to raise awareness of the importance of fresh produce consumption over the last few years. Freshfel Europe General Delegate Philippe Binard commented on the publication emphasizing, “The findings of Freshfel Europe’s 2020 Consumption Monitor are highly encouraging and clearly illustrate that the sector’s heightened efforts to boost consumption above the WHO recommended minimum of 400 g per capita per day are being paid off. While we will continue to observe the stability of this recovery, we need to investigate this new discrepancy between fruit and vegetable consumption”. Mr Binard encouraged the sector to continue its efforts adding, “The fresh fruit and vegetable sector must capitalize on 2021 being the UN International Year of Fruits and Vegetables. Continued reinforcement of the important role of fresh produce in a balanced healthy and sustainable diet is essential to maintain and boost this latest positive consumption trend”. Freshfel Europe is active in consumption promotion activities at EU-level. Freshfel Europe’s ‘Follow me to be healthy with Europe’ EU promotion campaign is now in its third year, and alongside its longstanding online #FruitVeg4You campaign this year Freshfel Europe is conducting a specific campaign, #SpeakUp4FruitVeg, to encourage support for the sector by EU policy-makers and boost consumption to celebrate the International Year of Fruits and Vegetables 2021.

The 143-page Freshfel Europe 2020 Consumption Monitor consists of three parts:

  1. total gross supply of fruit and vegetables in the EU-28, including trends in production, exports and imports of fruit and vegetables (2013-2018),
  2. a comparative review of consumption trends across the EU-28 (2013-2018), and
  3. a review of the total net supply and trends exports and imports of fruit and vegetables in the EU-28 (2013-2018).

Freshfel Europe members receive the full report free of charge. The 2020 Consumption Monitor is also available for purchase for non-members at a rate of 1000 EUR. All information about the Freshfel Europe Consumption Monitor is available via the Freshfel website (www.freshfel.org).

Teetotalism trends in the Asia-Pacific region are becoming increasingly prevalent, with approximately *3three out of four (71 %) of consumers drinking less alcohol in August 2020, according to a survey by leading data and analytics company GlobalData. However, the adoption of alternative soft drinks remains low, at only one in five* consumers. In fact, APAC customers surveyed are more attracted by health claims – specifically products noted to help support mental wellbeing – with such products purchased by nearly a third of consumers. Going forward, it will be crucial for drinks brands to blur the lines around traditional alcoholic products and offer ‘better for you’ messaging.

Carmen Bryan, Consumer Analyst at GlobalData, comments: “APAC consumers are turning away from alcohol driven by concerns around physical and mental health. While general health concerns take precedence, backed by *almost half (49 %) of the region’s population, weight management, fitness, physical appearance and emotional wellbeing are all considerable factors driving low or no-alcohol innovations.”

Recognizing this trend, New Zealand-based companies Adashiko and Parker Beverages recently launched a collagen-infused bottled water, marketed as ‘premium’ and ‘sophisticated’. This launch leverages growing demand for alternatives to alcohol that incorporate functional properties, writes GlobalData.

Bryan adds: “By incorporating functional and beneficial ingredient formulations, companies such as Adashiko-Parker Beverages are able to align to personalized health trends and cater to an evolving consumer landscape.”

Looking at alcohol consumption trends more closely, GlobalData’s research reveals that, of the *271 % of consumers drinking less, a sizeable *20 % (one in five) have stopped drinking alcohol altogether. In contrast, when asked a similar question in the US.

Bryan adds: “As pubs and bars closed their doors this year, and tensions regarding public health heightened, consumers were forced to reassess their priorities and lifestyles. Trends are shaping new home-bound leisure and social occasions where consumers seek the same taste and feel of mature drinks without the negative implications.”

Japanese FMCG company, Morinaga, is leveraging these trends with its amazake product range. Most notably, the Morigana Collagen in Haenuki flavour puts a healthy twist on the traditional sweet and low-alcohol Japanese drink by highlighting the high collagen and alcohol-free claims.

Bryan adds: “GlobalData’s research highlights the importance of premium positioning and clear ‘better for you’ messaging. By leveraging wellbeing factors such as natural, immunity-boosting or skin health, brands can create a premium product that blurs consumers’ perceptions around traditional alcoholic products. A rebranding mission, of sorts. Going forward, it will be crucial for brands to blur these lines further, emphasizing the positive health credentials that will help reassure consumers, both mentally and physically, to tap into multiple consumption occasions and justify a potentially higher price mark up.”

*GlobalData’s 2020 market pulse survey – Asia-Pacific – published 1 September  2020
*2Combined responses: “I try to consume a moderate amount” and “I am trying to reduce my intake as much as possible”
*3Combined responses: “I try to consume a moderate amount”, “I am trying to reduce my intake as much as possible”, and “I avoid this entirely”

Young Indian beer lovers are leading the way in responsible beer consumption, as the latest research from Mintel highlights that more than two in five (41 %) Indian beer drinkers aged 25 – 34 say they are interested in switching from standard strength beer to low/no alcohol (LNA) versions.

While alcohol moderation is becoming more pronounced among Indians as a whole, with an average of 38 % of Indian beer consumers* interested in switching to low/no alcohol versions, the over 45s (32 %) are less enthusiastic about making this switch.

The top three barriers for beer consumption among Indian consumers include health reasons (48 %), to avoid getting drunk (35 %) and to avoid hangovers (31 %).

Natasha Kumar, Mintel Food and Drink Analyst, India, said: “Responsible and healthy drinking has become the mantra amongst young Indians today. While this behaviour is seen across all age groups with Indians showing interest in LNA beer, it is more noticeable amongst young consumers aged 25-34 years. Brands need to explore opportunities around reduced or no alcohol options since this consumer group makes up a significant majority of beer drinkers in the country. With the current pandemic causing consumers to be even more conscious about their health and diet, the LNA category is expected to grow further post the lockdown. It also offers brands the opportunity to connect with health-conscious and responsible beer drinkers, which will prevent them from dropping out of the beer category entirely.”

Indian beer lovers are watching their waistlines

Shining a spotlight on health and wellbeing, Mintel research highlights that many Indian consumers are interested in trying low-calorie (43 %) and gluten-free (32 %) beer. In fact, over a third of consumers (34 %) say low-calorie content is an important factor when purchasing beer.

“As consumers claim that health is a key deterrent for regular beer consumption, the opportunity lies in expanding beer offerings with healthier profiles addressing concerns surrounding health. Low-calorie, low-carb and gluten-free beers can all appeal to this consumer need. As one of the largest producers of millet in the world, Indian brewers can turn towards this unconventional grain to cater to consumer demand. Countries such as Norway and Spain can act as good reference points for Indian brands to take inspiration for gluten-free beer. Diversifying the portfolio will help brands to expand consumer base to those health-conscious consumers,” continues Natasha Kumar.

Packaging innovations in craft beer can cater to the masses

Finally, Mintel research highlights that the most preferred type of beer includes lager (63 %) and wheat beer (51 %). In addition, craft beer is consumed by almost half of Indian consumers (45 %) and is perceived to be of high quality and worth a premium price, as three in four consumers (75 %) agree that it is worth paying more for it over mainstream beer.

“The popularity of lager and wheat beer indicate that lighter beers are more suitable to the Indian palate. For craft beer to appeal to a larger population of consumers, brands should innovate and introduce more craft beer varieties in lager, ale and wheat beer. One of the main benefits of craft beer is that consumers perceive it is better quality and as such, they are willing to pay more for it. Brands can premiumise their brand portfolio by adding craft beers to target consumers who are willing to pay extra. Craft beer was gaining significant traction in the country, however, the lockdown has caused pubs/microbreweries to shut, limiting the majority of craft beer sales. Bottling/canning could be the next step for craft beer brands, ensuring it reaches consumers with wider distribution, retail stocking and relatively longer shelf life.” concludes Natasha Kumar.

*1,655 Indian internet users aged 25+ who have drunk beer in the past six months

While whole fruit consumption increased in children between 2003 and 2016, the intake of several important nutrients decreased over time, a new study shows. Adding 100 % orange juice to the diet could help address this shortfall and bolster intake of other key nutrients.

A cross sectional analysis using the nationally representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data on children ages 2 to 18 found significantly higher intakes of whole fruit yet a significant decrease in the intake of folate, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamin C, vitamin D, sodium, potassium, iron and zinc over these time periods.

The FDOC-funded study published in the International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition in July, found that from 2003-2016, the amount of all 100 % fruit juice consumed decreased 44 percent while the percentage of total fruit consumed from whole fruit increased from about 45 percent in 2003 to 65 percent in 2016.

However, the intake of 100 % orange juice (and other 100 % fruit juices) was the likely food source(s) associated with increased consumption of calcium, potassium and phosphorus in certain populations at both time periods (2003 and 2016) and OJ consumers tended to have lower intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages.

The researchers suggest that a possible strategy to decrease inadequate intake of calcium, potassium, and phosphorus is to increase the consumption of 100 % orange juice and other 100 % fruit juice and decrease the consumption of sweetened beverages and coffee/tea.

“Potassium and calcium are under consumed by Americans and have been deemed nutrients of public health concern. These nutrients are important for growing children and 100 % orange juice, particularly calcium-fortified juice, can help enhance the intake of these and other key nutrients,” said Dr. Rosa Walsh, Director of Scientific Research for the Florida Department of Citrus.

Further, vitamin C intake in children has decreased over time and more children have inadequate intake levels. While not linked directly to the decreased consumption of 100 % fruit juice, the results suggest that the increased intake of whole fruit is not adequately addressing vitamin C shortfalls.

Adding 100 % orange juice to the diet, in appropriate amounts as outlined by the American Association of Pediatrics (AAP), can help address the shortfalls or gaps in the intakes of folate, thiamin, vitamin C, potassium and vitamin D in fortified juices. The AAP guidelines suggest limiting portions of 100 % fruit juice to 4 oz. a day for children 1 to 3, 4 to 6 oz. a day for children 4 to 6 and 8 oz. a day for children 7 to 18.

More research is needed to determine the best way to support childhood nutrition. FDOC’s Scientific Research Department has several ongoing projects with researchers to examine the role of 100 % orange juice in the diets of children and adolescents.

Despite the initial scare for the beer and cider market, expectation is that new 2022 forecasts, which falls short of the original baseline expectations, could have been much worse, says GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

According to the company’s recent (June 5) COVID-19 adjusted forecasts, the global beer and cider market will recover to 2019 value by 2022, reaching US$630.4bn in 2022; this represents a difference of -US$55.4bn against the previous baseline value of that same year*.

Aaron Bryson, Consumer Analyst at GlobalData, comments: “The substantial shrinkage is a reflection of the damage caused by a nonexistent foodservice channel throughout much of the year. In contrast, consumer confidence, which was initially decimated but rebounded relatively quickly, saw consumers retreating to the comfort of their own home with their favorite brands of beer and cider, as opposed to at the local pub.”

According to GlobalData’s Week 10 COVID-19 tracker consumer survey, published on June 3, 43 % of global respondents still expect the situation to get worse over the next month in their respective countries*2. Despite this, consumers purchasing habits in relation to beer and cider have largely been maintained. The same survey found that 45 %*3 of respondents have been purchasing the same amount or more beer, since the outbreak of COVID-19. In contrast, only 28 %*4 of respondents stated that they had reduced or stopped buying beer since the outbreak.

A similar story is seen with cider. The survey found that 33 %*3 of respondents had maintained or increased the volume of cider they purchase, and 28 %*4 had also reduced or stopped purchasing cider, since the outbreak.

Bryson continues: “The original concern displayed at the beginning of the outbreak had limited longer impacts upon beer and cider sales. A key reason being that, at home drinking is part of a routine for certain consumer cohorts in which they derive both pleasure and comfort. Something which most people have been looking for since the outbreak.”

Whilst the outlook for the beer industry is expected to lag behind pre-COVID-19 expectations, the immediate fallout, which posed a challenging landscape for big and small players alike, has largely leveled out. Consumers have shown a preference to fall back on familiar brands which they derive enjoyment from, with a willingness to pay a premium price, instead of switching to cheaper alternatives.

*GlobalData’s COVID-19: COVID-19 Impact Market Model – Consumer Goods – June 5 update – value US$
*2GlobalData’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) Tracker Consumer Survey – Week 10 (June 3) – global – a bit/lot worse responses combined GlobalData’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) Tracker Consumer Survey – Week 10 (June 3) – global –
*3started buying/same/more/significantly more/stockpiling responses combined,
*4 buying slightly lower/significantly lower/stopped altogether responses combined
Data is adjusted weekly following COVID-19 developments, therefore subject to change

A study published in the Journal of Nutrition examined the diets of over 36,000 adults in the Netherlands and reports that the intake of pure fruit juice, such as 100 % orange juice, was not associated with a higher risk for type 2 diabetes.

Consumption of any amount of fruit juice, including the highest intake category of eight or more glasses per week, was not associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, according to the study. When the researchers isolated citrus juice intake (orange and grapefruit juice combined), the results were consistent – intake of citrus juices was not associated with an increased risk for diabetes.

This study reinforces the case that fruit juices are not the same as sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), particularly with respect to metabolic effects and risk for diabetes. One hundred percent fruit juices have lower glycemic index compared to SSBs and contain beneficial nutrients not found in SSBs, including vitamins, minerals, and bioactive/polyphenolic compounds.

An 8-ounce glass of 100 % orange juice is an excellent source of vitamin C, a good source of potassium, folate, and thiamin, and supplies hesperidin, a polyphenol that has been shown to have health benefits. Orange juice also counts as a fruit serving to help meet fruit intake recommendations.

The study used data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands cohort, which began collecting diet and health data in 1993 through 1997 from adults age 20 through 70. The study examined dietary records completed at baseline and categorized fruit juice intake into several intake categories ranging from none to eight or more glasses per week (one glass was considered to be approximately 5 ounces). The study identified 1,477 verified cases of type 2 diabetes over an average 14-year follow up period.

The advantage of this study is that it examined data from a large number of individuals who were followed for a long period of time. However, as a prospective cohort study, data are self-reported, and it cannot show cause and effect. While the analysis took into account important factors that could affect results, such as age, sex, education level, physical activity level, body mass index and overall diet quality, prospective cohort studies are not able to consider each and every factor that could potentially affect results.

Reference:

  • Pure Fruit Juice and Fruit Consumption Are Not Associated with Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes after Adjustment for Overall Dietary Quality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition–Netherlands (EPIC-NL) Study
  • Floor R Scheffers, Alet H Wijga, WM Monique Verschuren, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Ivonne Sluijs, Henriëtte A Smit, and Jolanda MA Boer.
  • Journal of Nutrition. 2020 Jan 14. pii: nxz340. doi: 10.1093/jn/nxz340. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Although there is strong evidence that consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced rate of all-cause mortality, only a minority of the population consumes 5 servings a day, and campaigns to increase intake have had limited success. This review examines whether encouraging the consumption of fruit juice might offer a step toward the 5-a-day target. Reasons given for not consuming whole fruit involve practicalities, inconvenience, and the effort required. Psychologically, what is important is not only basic information about health, but how individuals interpret their ability to implement that information. It has been argued that fruit juice avoids the problems that commonly prevent fruit consumption and thus provides a practical means of increasing intake and benefitting health through an approach with which the population can readily engage. Those arguing against consuming fruit juice emphasize that it is a source of sugar lacking fiber, yet juice provides nutrients such as vitamin C, carotenoids, and polyphenols that offer health-related benefits. Actively encouraging the daily consumption of fruit juice in public health policy could help populations achieve the 5-a-day recommendation for fruit and vegetable intake.

Please download the full article under https://bit.ly/2lYVZAJ

Source: Oxford Academic

Scientifically formulated range that replenishes nutrients and minerals lost during partying, travelling and exercising

HangZing is an innovative business founded by a British Chemical Engineer and is committed to using ground-breaking technology to create radical food and drink products.

HangZing produces a revolutionary range of drinks designed to give a natural pick-me-up for people that work hard and play hard. The drinks are scientifically formulated using a blend of naturally-functional ingredients to fight the after-effects of alcohol consumption and to replenish the nutrients and minerals lost during partying, traveling and exercising.

Available in two innovative varieties, Lychee & Lemongrass and Garden Mint, every convenient 100 ml bottle is made by combining herbs, electrolytes and vitamins. The range is sweetened naturally from pure Canadian maple syrup and is free from added sugar, sweeteners and is suitable for vegans.

HangZing helps individuals reboot and get the most from their day and provides a natural alternative to unhealthy “morning after” remedies, including pain killers and junk food.

Product Functionality and Usage

As the liver metabolizes alcohol, a compound called Acetaldehyde is produced as a by-product. Acetaldehyde is a harmful, toxic compound for the human body. It is this that causes the headaches, nausea, muscle aches, fatigue, increased sensitivity to light and facial flushing associated with too much drinking.

HangZing works in three ways. First, it harnesses the powers of the hepatoprotective herbs Hovenia Dulcis, Milk Thistle, Nopal Cactus and Siberian Ginseng, which may facilitate the breakdown of the by-product Acetaldehyde into smaller components which can then be passed through the system.

Aloe Vera, Turmeric and Vitamin C work together to reduce the inflammation and neutralize the acidity in the stomach to ease discomfort, along with boosting the immune system. Finally, electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and vitamin B complex (B1, B3, B6, B5, B12, B9) replenish the minerals and nutrients lost from drinking.

Many variables including age, weight, sex and ethnicity affect how individuals are able to detoxify alcohol in their system. To address this diversity, HangZing’s research and development involved creating a proprietary formula in a bottling laboratory through an iterative approach of testing different quantities of each ingredient on hundreds of people over a period of time.

“Extensive research has shown that dihydromyricetin (DHM), a compound in hovenia dulcis, boosts the ability of the enzymes ADH and ALDH to break down both alcohol and acetaldehyde. The research concludes that DHM can, therefore, speed up the process with which the liver breaks down acetaldehyde into smaller compounds, such as acetate, carbon dioxide and water, which can then be expelled through breathing, sweat and urine.” *(Chen et al., 2006)

HangZing is designed for anyone who wants to get the most out of the day after a heavy evening the night before, from busy professionals to those marking a special occasion. Packaged in a box of six 100 ml bottles, HangZing works best when consumed just before bed with plenty of water.

HangZing is available via Amazon Prime and the brand’s website: www.hangzing.com in two varieties, Lychee and Lemongrass and Garden Mint, for $28.99 per box (6 x 100 ml bottles).

*Chen, S., Li, A., Li, S., Wu, L. and Zhong, G. (2006). Influence of Hovenia dulcis on alcohol concentration in blood and activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of animals after drinking. China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica, 31(13), pp. 1094-1096.

A new study suggests higher consumption of sugary beverages, including fruit juice, is associated with increased mortality.

Gavin Partington, director-general of the British Soft Drinks Association, said: “This study is inconclusive, and the way its findings are presented is misleading. All age groups in the UK are falling short on their 5 A Day consumption of fruit and vegetables. Therefore, warning against consuming a small 150 ml portion of pure fruit juice – which counts as one of your 5 A Day – risks people foregoing the vitamin and phytonutrient benefits of fruit juice that this study acknowledges.

“Our research shows adults and teenagers who drink fruit juice are about twice as likely to reach their recommended minimum of 5 A Day, than non-drinkers.”

You can read the highly controversial study “Association of Sugary Beverage Consumption With Mortality Risk in US Adults” under: www.jamanetwork.com

Last year’s hot summer boosted UK water drinks consumption by more than 7 % to 4,267 million litres, according to a new report from food and drink experts Zenith Global. This was worth an estimated £ 3,330 million at retail prices.

Sales of plain bottled water in retail packs increased by 7.9 % to 3.4 billion litres, whilst sales of flavoured, functional and juicy waters rose by 7.2 %.

A key driver behind the growth was the warmest summer on record, according to the Met Office. The new soft drinks levy from April 2018, on products with a higher added sugar content, appears to have had a limited impact, after most manufacturers pre-emptively reformulated many products to avoid the tax.

Pressure undoubtedly increased on producers to improve their environmental profile. For the first time, the report documents packaging innovations such as recycled content as well as examining initiatives in recycling and deposit return schemes.

Zenith Global predicts that the UK market will continue to grow robustly, but at a slower pace than in recent years. “Our forecasts to 2023 show an upward trend of 3 – 5 % a year,” commented Zenith Global Senior Consultant Robin Bell. “Debate about plastic and recycling are likely to remain centre stage and we expect to see more packaging from alternative materials becoming mainstream,” he concluded.

Closure Systems International (CSI) and Talkin’ Things®, the leading innovator in product communication platforms, have collaborated to integrate smart packaging technology into CSI’s global platform of closures. CSI and Talkin’ Things have developed a new packaging solution named Talkin’ Cap, which uses embedded Near Field Communication (NFC) tags, for application on the inside of closures. This technology introduces a powerful platform to support a brand owner’s mobile marketing activities right from the package itself…with just a simple tap.

Brand trustworthiness and product reliability are paramount for consumer loyalty. Talkin’ Caps ensure product safety and reduce brand owners’ liability by protecting against counterfeiting and “gray market” activities throughout the distribution stream.

CSI’s Talkin’ Caps allow for real-time consumer interconnectivity at the point of consumption, giving brand owners the unique ability to have dynamic interaction and gather actionable insights based on consumer location and usage history.

With 90 % of consumers using their smartphone to help make purchase decisions in a brick and mortar setting1, Talkin’ Caps are an app-less way to drive marketing content, brand and product information, gamification, loyalty programs, awards and coupons to connected consumers.

1https://www.fastcompany.com/3007362/customers-dont-want-ads-they-want-conversation

Tetra Pak now obtains half of its global electricity supply from renewable sources, putting the company firmly on course to meet its RE100 commitment of using only renewable electricity across all global operations by 2030.

In the past two years alone, the company’s use of renewable electricity has increased by a factor of 2.5, up from 20 % in 2016. This has been achieved through a combination of initiatives, including the purchase of International Renewable Energy Certificates (I-RECs) and solar power installations at its own facilities.

Mario Abreu, Vice President Sustainability at Tetra Pak said: ‘Using renewable energy is an important part of our journey to reduce the carbon impact of our own operations and so help tackle climate change.

“Through the purchase of renewable energy certificates, we are investing in the development of infrastructure to increase the availability of renewable electricity. Meanwhile, we are also exploring opportunities to scale up our own on-site solar power installations.”

Tetra Pak’s factories in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and South Africa use electricity from 100 % renewable sources and 17 of its major sites now run exclusively on renewable electricity.

The company was the first to source Gold-Standard I-RECs in Thailand, where its local factory will soon also generate an additional 1MW renewable electricity from solar panels. Elsewhere in the world, it is a major purchaser of I-REC certificates in China, and was the first to source Ekoenergy solar power in South Africa.

RE100 is a global, collaborative business initiative led by The Climate Group in partnership with CDP to drive demand for, and delivery of, renewable power.

UK consumption of water drinks rose 7 % in 2017 to nearly 4,000 million litres, with a retail value of £3.1 billion, according to a new report from global food and drink experts Zenith.

Sales of plain bottled water in retail packs increased by 8 % to over 3,100 million litres, while volume through bottled water coolers grew a more modest 2 % to 310 million litres. This marks a slowdown in growth from the preceding four years, partly as a result of poor summer weather. Conversely, sales of flavoured, functional and juicy waters, which increased by 2 % in 2016, advanced by 5 % in 2017, after more strong branded players entered the market.

Plain bottled water, with average annual consumption of 54 litres per person, strengthened its market dominance in 2017 to account for 87% of total sales. Flavoured water’s share of the market fell to 11 % volume share, with juicy and functional water making up the remaining 2 %. In terms of water types, still water drinks accounted for 83 % of total volume in 2017, with sparkling water drinks contributing 17 %.

The top 5 UK plain water brands – Highland Spring, Evian, Buxton, Nestlé Pure Life and Volvic – are collectively responsible for 30 % of total water drinks sales, whilst the top 5 water plus brands – Volvic Touch of Fruit, Calypso Clear, Trederwen Essence, Drench Juicy and Perfectly Clear – account for 5 %.

Zenith forecasts that, by 2022, the total market for UK water drinks will reach 5.3 billion litres, 32 % above 2017 levels. Plain bottled water is set to lead this advance, with average growth of 6 % per year. Flavoured, functional and juicy waters are forecast to expand more slowly.

Global consumption of ready-to-drink coffee reached 5,500 million litres in 2017, a 19 % increase since 2012, according to a new report from global food and drink experts Zenith. Further growth is forecast, with sales expected to exceed 6,600 million litres in 2022.

“Japan is by far the biggest market, with 55 % of global volume, and is relatively mature with a significant proportion heated in vending machines,” commented Zenith Chairman Richard Hall.

“Much of the dynamism is coming from North America, with annual growth of 13 % and the introduction of many new trends such as cold brew, nitrogen infusion, carbonation and black coffees,” he continued. “Iced coffees are also gaining ground worldwide from low levels because of their taste, refreshment, convenience and quality.”

In terms of regional shares, Asia Pacific leads with 83 % of total volume, followed by North America and Europe with 10 % and 3 % respectively. Consumption has increased across all regions since 2012, spurred by new product development and increasing interest in healthier beverage choices.