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GNT has achieved a 22 % reduction in carbon intensity at its EXBERRY® factories since 2020, the company’s latest sustainability report shows.

GNT, which creates EXBERRY® colours from non-GMO fruit, vegetables, and plants, has set out 17 ambitious targets to optimise its environmental and social impacts over the course of the current decade.

In 2023, GNT’s total carbon footprint at its production sites in the Netherlands, Germany, and USA stood at nearly 13 thousand metric tons of CO2-equivalent emissions. This means 22 % less CO2 was emitted per ton of product sold compared to the base year of 2020, taking GNT almost halfway toward its ambition to achieve a 50 % reduction by 2030.

The new sustainability report reveals there was important progress in a number of other areas. GNT aims to enhance water efficiency at its factories by 20 % and has already delivered a 13 % improvement compared to 2020 levels. In addition, 74 % of the farmers in the company’s supply chain achieved a minimum of Farm Sustainability Assessment (FSA) Silver standard. The compliance rate for GNT’s Policy on Sustainable Sourcing, meanwhile, increased from 70 % to 90 %.

GNT also secured an EcoVadis silver medal last year and remains the only food colour supplier to have published a third-party Greenhouse Gas Verification Statement.

To read GNT’s ‘Sustainability report 2023,’ visit: https://exberry.com/en/sustainability-report-2023

GNT has achieved a 22 % reduction in carbon intensity at its EXBERRY® factories since 2020, the company’s latest sustainability report shows.

GNT, which creates EXBERRY® colours from non-GMO fruit, vegetables, and plants, has set out 17 ambitious targets to optimise its environmental and social impacts over the course of the current decade.

In 2023, GNT’s total carbon footprint at its production sites in the Netherlands, Germany, and USA stood at nearly 13 thousand metric tons of CO2-equivalent emissions. This means 22 % less CO2 was emitted per ton of product sold compared to the base year of 2020, taking GNT almost halfway toward its ambition to achieve a 50 % reduction by 2030.

The new sustainability report reveals there was important progress in a number of other areas. GNT aims to enhance water efficiency at its factories by 20 % and has already delivered a 13 % improvement compared to 2020 levels. In addition, 74 % of the farmers in the company’s supply chain achieved a minimum of Farm Sustainability Assessment (FSA) Silver standard. The compliance rate for GNT’s Policy on Sustainable Sourcing, meanwhile, increased from 70 % to 90 %.

GNT also secured an EcoVadis silver medal last year and remains the only food colour supplier to have published a third-party Greenhouse Gas Verification Statement.

To read GNT’s ‘Sustainability report 2023,’ visit: https://exberry.com/en/sustainability-report-2023

Family-owned spirits company, Bacardi has successfully completed the world’s first commercial production of a glass spirits bottle fueled by hydrogen in a trial that took place in December 2023.

Bacardi worked with premium glassmaker, Hrastnik1860, to pioneer new technology that powered a glass furnace with hydrogen as its primary energy source and in doing so cut the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions typically produced as a byproduct of glass bottle production.

The bottle, which for the purposes of the trial was the iconic ST-GERMAIN® elderflower liqueur bottle, is identical in appearance to the bottle produced using traditional methods and will reach bars and stores in the coming weeks.

Over the course of the trial, which produced 150,000 of the brand’s 70 cl glass bottles, hydrogen contributed more than 60 % of the fuel for the glass furnace, cutting GHG emissions by more than 30 %.

To achieve its ambition of becoming the most environmentally responsible global spirits company, Bacardi is continuously investing in new innovations and exploring opportunities to use pioneering new technology to help achieve its ultimate goal of Net Zero.

About Hrastnik1860
Hrastnik1860, a member of the Vaider Group, has more than 160 years of expertise in glass and is a global partner in the development and manufacturing of world-class engineered glass products. The company is known for creating technically demanding bottles, primarily for the spirits industry, and is a full-service solution partner—from R&D and consulting to innovative design, prototyping, manufacturing, decoration, and delivery. Hrastnik1860’s products are acclaimed for their perfect crystal shine and are entirely free of heavy metals. They range from traditional designs to innovative solutions that have won many prestigious awards.

Following successful commercial consumer testing in 2022, Tetra Pak and Lactogal have now launched an aseptic beverage carton featuring a paper-based barrier. This is part of a large-scale technology validation, involving around 25 million packages and currently ongoing in Portugal. Made of approximately 80 % paperboard, the package increases the renewable content to 90 %, reduces its carbon footprint by one third (33 %1) and has been certified as Carbon Neutral by the Carbon Trust.2

Greenhouse gas emissions, food waste and plastic littering are cited as the top three environmental sustainability concerns facing food and beverage (F&B) businesses today, and this is expected to remain the case over the next five years.3 Packaging solutions like these, that expand the amount of paper and lower the carbon footprint, while ensuring food safety, can help the industry overcome these challenges.

In 2015, Tetra Pak was the first in the industry to introduce a package made fully from plant-based renewable materials – paperboard and sugarcane-based plastic. The Tetra Rex® Plant-based package, suitable for cold chain distribution, is fully renewable, and the company has delivered approximately 6.5 billion of these packages to customers around the world to date.

Now, the launch of the Tetra Brik® Aseptic 200 Slim Leaf carton with paper-based barrier, together with Lactogal, provides a package that can be distributed under ambient conditions, while hitting the 90% renewable content mark. This brings Tetra Pak one step closer to its ambition of a beverage carton made solely from responsibly sourced renewable or recycled materials, fully recyclable and carbon neutral. The company is aiming for industrial scale production of the solution by 2025.

1Certified by the Carbon Trust – benchmark: Tetra Brik® Aseptic 200 Slim Leaf carton package with aluminium foil layer.
2“Carbon neutral” means that, after reducing the CO2 emissions by converting the package’s fossil-based polymers into plant-based polymers to the highest possible extent, the residual CO2 emissions associated with the packaging manufacture are offset by funding Gold Standard-certified climate projects around the world.
3Tetra Pak B2B research on Planetary Challenges and their impact on F&B manufacturers’ operations (2023).

Building upon the successful partnership established in 2022 (with the aim to produce the first heat exchanger made with fossil-free steel) Alfa Laval will now incorporate SSAB’s unique fossil carbon emission free and recycled steel (SSAB Zero™), into its heat exchangers. This represents an important milestone towards achieving a global carbon neutral supply chain.

Key highlights:

  • Tackling global carbon emissions: Steel production accounts for 7 percent of the world’s carbon emissions, making it a critical industry in the fight against climate change. The collaboration between Alfa Laval and SSAB aims to address this challenge, with emissions being predominantly generated from a limited number of locations.
  • Reducing carbon footprint: By integrating SSAB’s fossil carbon emission free, recycled steel, produced through renewable-based processes, into Alfa Laval’s heat exchangers, the collaboration takes an important step towards achieving a global carbon neutral supply chain.
  • Double impact on global emissions: Initially more than 100 heat exchangers will be delivered this year – and significantly more the coming years. These heat exchangers will be deployed to improve energy efficiency in numerous areas such as HVAC, marine, process and food industries.

“Alfa Laval’s commitment to sustainability is further strengthened through our collaboration with SSAB,” says Thomas Møller, President of the Energy Division at Alfa Laval. “By incorporating their recycled steel in our heat exchangers, we are not only reducing our own carbon footprint but also driving the entire value chain towards a cleaner and more sustainable future.”

”SSAB is really accelerating the roll-out of zero-emission steel with our newest product SSAB Zero,” says Thomas Hörnfeldt, Head of Sustainable Business at SSAB. “We are now expanding our partnership with Alfa Laval to include SSAB Zero, and can look forward to visible results already this year. This is great news, and also allows us to help mitigate climate change even faster.”

Leading soft drinks business, Britvic, is redoubling its efforts to cut carbon emissions and save energy – with £8 million of investment to improve efficiency at its London factory.

The project, which kicks off this year at its Beckton site, will see the installation of a new heat recovery system – cutting factory emissions by an estimated 1,200 tonnes annually – equivalent to the annual energy usage of around 500 UK homes.

Part funded by a £4.4 million government grant from the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero, the new heat recovery system will see the soft drink manufacturer switching its heating from natural gas boilers to carbon free heat extractors.

Nigel Paine, Supply Chain Director, added: “At our Beckton site we produce 2,000 drinks every minute – including many of the nation’s favourites such as Robinsons, Tango and Pepsi MAX. We are constantly looking at ways to improve the way we create these products and I’m delighted that, as well as our own funds, the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero will be supporting us too. It means we can continue to supply the nation with great tasting drinks, while reducing our carbon footprint.”

With the help of the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero’s Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, this heat recovery system will take waste heat recovered from our existing systems, increase the temperature and redistribute it around the site using a new low temperature hot water network, replacing our carbon intensive steam system. This will decarbonise 50 % of the site’s heat demand by shifting its heat source away from fossil fuels.

Sarah Webster, Director of Sustainable Business, at Britvic, said: “This major investment represents a significant milestone in our journey to reduce our scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions in service of our science-based targets, and our Healthier People Healthier Planet sustainability strategy. The support from the Department for Energy Security and Net Zero has been integral to making this happen and it re-enforces our view that collaboration and partnership is critical to developing long-lasting meaningful solutions to protect the planet.”

With the project set to commence at the end of 2023, the move is a huge step towards Britvic’s commitment to reduce its direct emissions by 50 % by 2025 and to be net zero target by 2050, verified by the Science Based Target initiative. Britvic is making good progress having reduced its direct carbon emissions by 34 % since 2017.

Revolutionary strategic partnership between two global companies, with footprints extending from the farm gate to iconic foods and beverages, provides unprecedented and unique opportunity to expand regen ag at scale

ADM and PepsiCo announced a groundbreaking 7.5-year strategic commercial agreement to closely collaborate on projects that aim to significantly expand regenerative agriculture across their shared North American supply chains. This strategic partnership is expected to reach up to 2 million acres by 2030, and represents a trailblazing effort by two global companies that share ambitious carbon reduction goals. The companies’ capabilities span the food and agriculture value chains, creating a unique, large-scale platform to support farmers’ transition to regenerative agriculture, while building their resilience to climate change.

The long-term agreement will initially enroll corn, soy and wheat farmers across Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Nebraska, with the opportunity for future expansion, to increase visibility across the value chain and integrate a range of multi-year farmer-first regenerative agriculture initiatives, including cover crops, reduced tillage, nutrient management, diverse rotations, and responsible pesticide use. The companies plan to share resources and collaborate to create value throughout the supply chain by providing participants with technical and financial assistance, offering access to peer regenerative farming networks, hosting educational field days, and tracking results using trusted, third-party measurement systems.

Reaching the strategic partnership’s goals could eliminate 1.4 million metric tons of greenhouse gasses – equivalent to the amount of electricity used to power 275,000 homes per year – at the farm level, while creating meaningful shared value directly for farmers.

“Building a better food system is essential to the future health of the earth and all of us,” said Jim Andrew, Chief Sustainability Officer, PepsiCo. “At its core, PepsiCo is an agricultural company, working to spread regenerative agriculture practices that restore the earth and reduce carbon emissions to 7 million acres by 2030. This partnership with ADM marks a sea change in how PepsiCo engages with strategic partners and is expected to help us reach almost one-third of that goal. By enabling greater collaboration through strategic partnerships like this one, we can strengthen the livelihoods and resilience of the farmers we work with, while building a more sustainable future together.”

“Sustainability is fundamental to ADM: Our growth strategy is underpinned by demand for more sustainable products, and our culture compels us to act,” said ADM Chief Sustainability Officer Alison Taylor. “Last year, we expanded on our Strive 35 sustainability goals with a commitment to reduce our Scope 3 emissions by 25 % by 2035, and expanding regenerative agriculture practices – as we have with our recent strategic partnerships with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Farmers Business Network – will be key to reaching that goal. Today’s announcement is a major step forward, as we work with a partner whose values align with our own to scale up regenerative agriculture in a way few other companies can. We’re excited to take the next big step in reducing carbon and making our entire food system more sustainable.”

pep+ is PepsiCo’s strategic, end-to-end business transformation with sustainability and human capital at the center of how the company will create growth and value. As part of those ambitions, the company is working to spread regenerative practices across 7 million acres of land by 2030 — an area approximately equal to its entire agricultural footprint – and striving to achieve net-zero emissions by 2040.

ADM’s Strive 35 sustainability goals include reducing absolute greenhouse gas emissions by 25 %, energy intensity by 15 %, water intensity by 10 %, and achieving a 90 % landfill diversion rate by 2035 against a 2019 baseline. In 2021, ADM additionally committed to a new, aggressive environmental goal to reduce Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions 25 % by 2035 while accelerating its target date to achieve a completely deforestation-free supply chain from 2030 to 2025. The company has also committed to work with the Science Based Targets Initiative with the aim of obtaining approval of its climate targets and alignment with ambitious global goals to limit rising temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Coca-Cola European Partners (CCEP) is set to accelerate the decarbonisation of its business by reducing absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across its entire value chain – including scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions – by 30 % by 2030 (vs 2019)* and setting a path to become a Net Zero business by 2040, in alignment with a 1.5˚C pathway and the Paris Climate Agreement.

CCEP will reduce GHG emissions across all five areas of its value chain – ingredients, packaging, operations, transportation and refrigeration. Crucially, there is a significant focus on reducing scope 3 emissions via a commitment to support strategic suppliers to set their own science-based carbon reduction targets and use 100 % renewable electricity.

CCEP’s immediate action plan is supported by a three-year €250m investment which will provide targeted financial support to decarbonise its business. This includes sustainable packaging initiatives, such as the progression of its 100 % rPET roadmap and investing in the scaling of depolymerisation technology, which will help accelerate the delivery of its longer-term net-zero objectives.

The ambition is underpinned by the inclusion of a GHG emissions reduction target in CCEP’s long term management incentive plan (LTIP) – 15 % of the LTIP awarded in 2020 will be based on the extent to which CCEP reduces GHG emissions over the next three years.

It builds on work undertaken over the last decade to reduce GHG emissions across CCEP’s entire value chain by 30.5 % (vs 2010) as part of This is Forward, its joint sustainability plan with Coca-Cola in Western Europe. CCEP’s 2030 GHG reduction commitment has been approved by the Science-Based Targets initiative (SBTi) as being in line with a 1.5˚C reduction pathway as recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

As part of its journey to Net Zero, CCEP will invest in projects which remove carbon from the atmosphere or verified carbon offset projects. However it will focus on reducing emissions as far as possible and will only offset where essential and where it can’t reduce emissions any further.

*This includes a commitment to reduce Scope 1 and 2 GHG emissions by 47 % and Scope 3 emissions 29 % by 2030 from a 2019 base year.

For many consumers, the desire to nurture and protect the environment has motivated the decision to follow a vegan diet. However, the ‘low carbon’ diet could potentially attract a greater following than veganism due its relatively more flexible approach to reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with our diets, says GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

In fact, when asked what they find to be an appealing food and drink claim, 60 %* of global consumers answered ‘low carbon footprint’, compared with 39 %* of global consumers who answered ‘vegan’.

Lia Neophytou, Consumer Analyst at GlobalData, says: “Whereas veganism does not permit the consumption of any animal or animal-derived products, the low carbon diet allows for the consumption of any food/drink items as long as they align with the broader goal of reducing the carbon emissions of one’s overall diet. This could include reducing meat and dairy consumption, increasing one’s intake of local foods, and reducing food and packaging waste.”

This diet also recognizes that not all vegan foods have a low carbon footprint. For example, exotic fruits which require importation from abroad. It is for this reason that Lele’s vegan café in London recently announced that it will no longer include avocado in its dishes to avoid ‘indirectly fuelling illegal deforestation and environmental degradation’.

The appeal of a low carbon diet therefore spans consumers who are already vegan and those who simply want to reduce their carbon footprint, hence its broader appeal.

Neophytou concludes: “In future, ‘low carbon’ certifications could become mainstream and serve as a way of verifying the environmental impact of food and drink. This goes beyond simply indicating the absence of animal or animal-derived products which vegan certifications signal.”

*GlobalData’s 2019 Q3 global consumer survey

The environmental benefits of SIGNATURE PACK from SIG have been confirmed by a critically reviewed ISO-conformant lifecycle assessment (LCA) – the world’s first for a mass balance product.

The SIGNATURE PACK from SIG is the world’s first aseptic carton pack linked to 100 % plant-based renewable materials. The LCA showed significant reductions in environmental impacts across all 10 categories as a result of the substitution of fossil-based polymers with mass balance plant-based polymers made from tall oil (a by-product of paper manufacturing).

The carbon footprint of SIGNATURE PACK is – on average across Europe – 66 % lower than the carbon footprint of a standard SIG 1-litre carton pack of the same format across its lifecycle, based on the Europe-wide LCA.

World’s first ISO-conformant LCA for a mass balance product

The polymers in SIGNATURE PACK are 100 % linked to plant-based material via a mass balance system, whereby plant-based raw materials are mixed in with conventional fossil raw materials to produce the polymers. The amount of plant-based material included in the mix is equivalent to the amount needed for the polymers used in SIGNATURE PACK and the totals are balanced through recognised and audited certification schemes to ensure strict traceability and accountability.

The SIGNATURE PACK LCA is the first ISO-conformant LCA to take into account the inclusion of materials via a mass balance system. LCAs are traditionally based on the physical contents of a product and the environmental impacts associated with each stage of its production.

The independent, critically reviewed LCA of SIGNATURE PACK was conducted in accordance with recognised international standards, ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 by the Institut für Energie und Umweltforschung (IFEU/Institute for Energy and Environmental Research) in Germany.

IFEU agreed to conduct the LCA when it became clear how valuable SIG’s mass balance approach could be in making mainstream polymer production more sustainable.

Driving more sustainable plastics

SIG chose a mass balance approach because it supports a wider transition from fossil to bio-based raw materials within the conventional and highly efficient polymer industry, instead of using niche small scale producers with a limited number of plastic grades.

The polymers are supplied by plastic producers, Sabic and BASF, using plant-based renewable material from European wood sources. Tall oil was selected as the feedstock because, as a by-product of paper production, it is a waste material rather than an agricultural crop that requires land and resources to grow.